golden hello
n. A cash bonus or other remuneration paid to a new employee as an incentive to join a company (c.f. golden handshake).

Example Citations:
City merchant banks are having to offer new graduates salaries of 30,000 [pounds] a year, plus golden hellos, as a big increase in demand for the elite pushes up starting rates.
—Lorna Bourke, “Golden hellos for graduates,“ The Evening Standard, November 5, 1997

Talented sixth-formers are being offered golden hellos worth thousands of pounds by universities keen to attract high-flyers.
—Judith O‘Reilly, “Universities offer golden hellos to woo top students,“ The Sunday Times, August 3, 1997

Earliest Citation:
Following the ‘golden handshake’, the ‘golden hello’ is taking root in British industry. Being paid a handsome lump sum before you even start a new job may sound too good to be true. But, last year alone, 50 top directors got such ‘golden hellos’.
—“Golden hellos from business,“ The Observer, May 15, 1983

Notes:
The phrase golden handshake dates to at least 1960, according to the OED (which is also the source of the earliest citation for golden hello). A thoroughbred horse named Golden Hello was active in the early 1960s (earliest use: April 4, 1961), so it's possible this name is a play on the earlier phrase.

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