stores with doors
n. Retail stores with physical locations.

Example Citation:
"In another move into brick and mortar, E-Trade is planning to set up a walk-in office on Manhattan's Madison Avenue by the end of the year, The Chronicle reported last month. But sources said the store will serve as a high-profile branding device, rather than the first in a chain of storefronts. Some observers think E-Trade still needs to venture further into the world of 'stores with doors.'"
—Carolyn Said, "E-Trade Expands Services," The San Francisco Chronicle, March 14, 2000

Earliest Citation:
"Stores with doors; Internet has joined, not beat, them."
—Headline, USA Today, August 4, 1999

Notes:
The earliest use of this phrase that I could find actually displays a different sense — a store that has actual doors, as opposed to a stall, kiosk, cart, or other small-scale (and doorless) retail operation:


"My rule of thumb is always bargain in stores without doors. In other words, bargain at market stalls, mercados and with street vendors. But even some stores with doors will agree to lower their set prices if you buy several things at once or are prepared to pay cash."
—Margie Meldman, "Bazaars and boutiques, back streets and boulevards," San Antonio Express-News, December 1, 1996

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