tunnel advertising
n. An advertisement consisting of a series of illuminated screens in a subway tunnel, each projecting one image from a sequence to create an animation effect as the train goes by.

Example Citations:
Tunnel advertising, which is being tested on the MARTA system in Atlanta, the New York-New Jersey PATH trains and subways in Athens and Seoul, would bring in about $400,000 annually and would take about eight months to introduce. The ads are a modern-day version of the famed Burma Shave signs of the 1930s to 1950s. BART riders would see the ads through the train window, watching a series of pictures mounted on the tunnel wall turn into a moving advertisement — sort of like a children's picture flip-book.
—Michael Cabanatuan, "BART seeking creative new ways to raise ad revenue," The San Francisco Chronicle, February 28, 2003

Submedia's tunnel advertising technology is based on a 19th century English toy — the zoetrope — which makes images inside a revolving cylinder appear to move, and passengers would view the illuminated ads as a train goes by.
—Anthony Tran, "US operator animated on moving picture subway ads," The Standard, October 6, 2003

Earliest Citation:
A recent push by the MTR which has seen a surge in the number of advertisements on trains, platforms and escalators is in danger of giving passengers ad-fatigue, experts have warned.

The Association of Accredited Advertising Agents of Hong Kong says the corporation — which is also considering between-station tunnel advertising — has already pushed the situation "to the extreme".
—Antoine So, "Tunnel vision on ads could backfire for MTR," South China Morning Post (Hong Kong), May 28, 2000

Notes:
Apparently there is no surface anywhere on earth that is safe from marketing messages. This latest form of advertising pestilence also goes by the names in-tunnel advertising and tunnel wall advertising.

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